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When will we get it?

Senator Vitter sent to me an update on his actions in DC. He is very proud of his work to help increase domestic oil to reduce our dependence on foreign oil production. Sen. Vitter is from Louisiana , the oil spill state and the current site of oil still in the water.

I live in the state next door that does not get revenue from oil companies drilling in Louisiana waters. What we do get is the crap from offshore drilling in those waters. I must be honest, I know many people in Mississippi who work in the Louisiana oil industry. I do not desire to see them unemployed,however; America needs to make real efforts to reduce dependency on oil.

I am for high-speed rail, however; many of the powers that be in the red states reject high-speed rail. LA, MS, AL, & FL are all red states affected by the oil spill. They also have rejected the idea of high-speed rail. Yet our coast lines are becoming toxic from oil production offshore.

As I read Sen. Vitter's update I was dismayed to see a continual push for environmentally destructive practices rather than the introduction of sound practices that will see us well into the future. I have included his email to me. May we continue to fight for progressive measures that will support our planet and out children for years to come.




Dear Friend,

Just one year ago, the average price at the pump for a gallon of gas was $2.80. Today, that figure has climbed above $3.50, with no relief in sight. With Louisiana families' budgets tight, an extra 70 cents per gallon is a significant financial burden.

In a speech this week, President Obama offered some vague platitudes, but no concrete plans to rein in those prices, even as they climb toward $4 per gallon. Even worse, his administration has sent a loan of more than $2 billion to Brazil to expand its offshore drilling operations.

What's most infuriating to us in Louisiana is that all of this is happening as the President's own Interior Department buries Gulf Coast energy projects under a mountain of regulations. Under Obama, Interior has largely refused to issue permits to energy-producing companies here at home.

This week, I laid out a far different path by introducing new legislation – 3-D: The Domestic Jobs, Domestic Energy, and Deficit Reduction Act of 2011. It would unleash our vast domestic energy potential to create American jobs, help free us from our reliance on foreign oil and begin to reduce our $14 trillion dollar national debt. The 3-D Act speeds up the permitting process while ensuring the responsible development of our abundant domestic resources.

And because energy production is the second-biggest source of revenue to the federal budget – behind only the personal income tax – passing the 3-D Act would put us back on a revenue-producing fiscal path. It even helps fund research for future, alternative sources of energy with revenue made from ANWR energy production – not your tax dollars.

We can take concrete steps to build a more secure foundation for our economy –one based on developing our own resources, creating good American jobs and lowering the deficit. I'm starting in Congress with 3-D: The Domestic Energy, Domestic Jobs and Deficit Reduction Act of 2011.




Watch an interview on this issue here

Please don't hesitate to contact my office if you have any questions about the claims process.

Sincerely,



David Vitter
United States Senator

P.s. Please visit my website to sign up for E-updates and receive regular email updates from me on the issues important to Louisiana families.

** To unsubscribe please visit my web site here. Please do not reply to this email.

For any other questions or concerns visit my Web site at: www.vitter.senate.gov.




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Comments

  1. There is a reason they are Conservative. They abhor change, hate it - and we all know hate is another word for fear.

    They know Oil. They don't know high-speed rail. So that means they fear that other people will become successful and they will fall from power. When it comes right down to it - its about loss of power.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Instead of taking the logical step of using their billions in profit (starting during the Bush administration) to take the lead in researching, developing & distributing alternative fuel sources, executives at ExxonMobil instead stated that this was not a priority, and spent less than 1% of those profits on alternative fuel R & D. Pathetic.

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